About This Site

About This Site - CKSO AM FM TV & CIGMIt would be an understatement to say the broadcast industry has changed in every aspect!  Today's digital technology has changed our production and delivery methods.  The markets have changed in so far as the over abundance of options and choice available to the listener or viewer.  The hardware and portability advances today make the transistor radio seem so archaic.  Consumers who listen to music, or watch video on a tablet are more or less classified as content consumers, while those who produce the audio and visual are seen as content creators.  Between the content creators and consumers, exists collectively, a huge and varied network of delivery systems.  Everything from transmitters, cable, Internet service providers, cell phone technology, wireless, etc. gives the consumer such a varied choice, that the business of broadcasting has changed immensely.

Among the pioneers and veterans of the broadcast industry, one might discover a unanimous agreement that there was a time when the business was more fun and certainly more personable.  Machines and computers could not do what a team of people was required to do.  Small and even medium market stations seem to be eaten up by increasingly larger conglomerates resulting in more centralized operation and management.  Any sense of camaraderie these days surely must be strained by the 'reduced' number of people working at any one station.

The initiative behind this site is twofold.  This web site provides a chance for all those who worked for Cambrian Broadcasting to reminisce, but also to explore the impact that the broadcaster had on the Sudbury area.

CKSO-TV signed on October 25th, 1953 becoming Canada's first privately owned television station.  The people behind this precedent were George Miller, Q. C., W. E. Mason, Jim Cooper Q.C, and Bill Plaunt,  This site will offer a review of the people, the programming and the equipment and the way in which the AM. FM and TV operations played a major role in the development of the area.